Posted by: healingseeker | October 24, 2012

Do you have breast cancer but lack health insurance?

Breast cancer symbols plus 6 signs of breast cancer title page
What do you do if you discover you have one of the six main symptoms of breast cancer; however, you do not have health insurance?

As you already learned in the article entitled “Breast Cancer: So you found a breast lump,” early detection is the key to potentially saving part or all of your breast, your lymph nodes, and potentially your life.

What are the six main symptoms of breast cancer?

1. Lump in the breast
2. Dimple or indentation on the breast
3. Rash on the breast
4. Puckering of the breast-skin
5. Nipple discharge
6. Breast suddenly deflates (i.e., shrinks) or inflates (i.e., grows)

Oh, no! You don’t have health insurance

If you discover you may have breast cancer but do not have health insurance, this is potentially not an insurmountable obstacle.

To read the rest of the article, click BREAST CANCER.

Posted by: healingseeker | October 24, 2012

Breast Cancer: So you found a breast lump

Breast cancer symbols plus 6 signs of breast cancer title page
So, you found a lump. You rub your eyes and look again at your reflection in the mirror. “Perhaps my eyes are deceiving me” is your next hope-filled thought. After all, breast cancer does not run in your family. Even if it does, it still could feel unbelievable and shocking.

You stretch out a shaking hand and feel of it. It’s hard and unyielding.

Since the ‘denial game’ is so much fun, you comfort yourself with the idea that it’s just a cyst that needs to be drained. That is true for some breast lumps. In fact, eight out of every ten breast lumps are benign. But, …

What if the lump you see in the mirror and feel with your hand is one of the two out of every ten that is malignant? In that case, the ‘denial game’ could turn lethal. So, for peace of mind’s sake, you make an appointment to see your doctor.

To read the rest of the article, click BREAST CANCER.

Posted by: healingseeker | October 28, 2011

Soy is an artificial estrogen

I called my oncologist today to get more details about the whole soy situation. I had forgotten to ask when I had my quarterly check-up. If you have not read this blog, then you may not know that I am a breast cancer survivor and cancer-free aka ‘in remission’. I had already learned that I should not take ‘One A Day’ Menopause for hot flashes as it had soy in it. Soy, in the form they utilize it in those vitamins, contributes to cancer. That made me wonder about soy milk, etc. So today I called to request clarification. This is what I learned.

 

Soy is an artificial estrogen. In case you are not aware, estrogen feeds cancer. Therefore, they recommend that I do not drink soy milk or take soy in any form. I was not actually drinking soy milk, but I sometimes used it as a milk substitute in recipes. I will no longer do that.

Posted by: healingseeker | October 4, 2011

Poem: A very grateful Breast Cancer Survivor

Debbie Dunn Moore in June of 2011 - Breast Cancer Survivor
Visit this page to read my poem about being a grateful breast cancer survivor.

Click BREAST CANCER to read my hub on Hubpages.

Posted by: healingseeker | October 4, 2011

Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Debbie Dunn Moore

Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Debbie Dunn Moore (my married name) was one of three women featured in the October 4, 2011 Greeneville Sun newspaper in Greeneville, TN. Why? It is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Here is part of the article posted.
Breast Cancer Awareness Month featuring Debbie Dunn Moore

P.S. Looks like there is a typo. It should have been “grateful” rather than the other spelling. Oops to whoever did the type-setting.

Posted by: healingseeker | September 19, 2011

Necessity of breast cancer awareness plus what I’ve learned

Breast Cancer symbol

Debbie Dunn Moore is very grateful to add her name to the ranks of the thousands of breast cancer survivors. Her breast cancer journey began just before Christmas of 2009 when she discovered a 3- by 5-inch tumor in the left side of her left breast. Under the wonderful care of Dr. Dharmen Patel, Dr. John Boys, Dr. Mark Patterson, and Dr. Joe Austin, she went through 8 rounds of chemo, a double mastectomy, and 35 days of radiation. As of November of 2010, she has been “in remission” or “cancer-free.” Here are the main lessons that she has learned:

(1) Be aware of what your breast already looks and feels like so that if it changes, you are alert enough to catch any signs of breast cancer early – before it has time to spread to other parts of your body. Other than a lump, please be aware that other potential signs of severe breast cancer include a dimple or indentation on your breast (don’t just think it is gravity kicking in because you are getting older as Debbie did), a rash on the breast, puckering of the breast, nipple discharge, and noticeable breast shrinkage. Visit a doctor as soon as possible. If you don’t have insurance, visit the Health Department to see if they might be of assistance.

(2) Joining a cancer support group such as the one held at Laughlin Hospital in Greeneville, Tennessee, can be extremely helpful.

(3) Maintaining a positive attitude and a sense of humor (even if it only be gallows humor) can make a world of difference in your recovery potential.

(4) Having a good support system of family and friends is extremely helpful.

(5) The power of prayer can truly work miracles.

If you would like to know more about Debbie’s breast cancer journey, feel free to read this blog at https://healingseeker.wordpress.com/. She is also writing a book on the topic that is coming out in 2012. When the book becomes available, she will post details on her website at http://askdjlyons.com/ and on this blog.

A great resource for women of Greene County, TN who are in need of a free mammogram. Click on FREE MAMMOGRAM SCREENINGS. If you are not from Greene County, TN, check with your local hospital. They may very well provide that same service as well.

5 March 2011

Things have been stabilizing in many areas of my life. Last time I sent an update, I was dealing with the whole lymphedema situation in my upper left arm. Since that time, I have gone through four out of my six physical therapy sessions. My insurance company has my compression sleeves on back order. Additionally, I am feeling more peaceful about the whole topic.

When I told my oncologist that the physical therapist indicated I would have to wear these compression sleeves every day for the rest of my life, he stated the following:

“This is how it is going to go. You will wear the sleeves for a while. Your arm will stop hurting. You will stop wearing the sleeves for a few days. When you notice your arm begin to hurt again, you resume wearing the sleeves. You wear them every day for a while. Your arm feels better. You leave off wearing the sleeves.”

That felt more freeing. Kind of that circle of life kind of thing. That feels much more comfortable than the words, “YOU MUST WEAR YOUR SLEEVES EVERY DAY FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE OR ELSE … BAD THINGS WILL HAPPEN.”

I have ordered several books on the topic. I have ordered a DVD on how to do the self-message and the exercises. Once the sleeves come in, I will schedule my last two physical therapy sessions to learn how to wear the sleeves and any last-minute information the therapist thinks will be helpful.

In the meantime, I have been joyfully distracted by a nearly month-long renovation going on in our log cabin for my home office. In brief, the room bowed toward the center. We thought it was because the ground had shifted underneath the cabin. Instead, when Tommy and Dal, the two men who do many of our repairs, tore up the floor, they discovered that some of the flimsy tree limbs or logs holding up the floor were broken through. I could have walked into my office one day and fallen through.

They tore up the floor, put down very sturdy floor joists, etc., etc. You can see the before and after pictures on this hub link. You will also see some of the highlights of some of the pictures during this multiple-day project.

Home Office Renovations Before and After Pictures

It just thrills me to the core to have such a pretty room to work in that is totally reflective of my personality.

Cousin Diane, you will notice the pretty prayer shawl that you crocheted for me when I started going through chemo. It is sitting on the back of my chair.

Teresa, you will notice the beautiful Egyptian scarf you sent me from Egypt back when you taught school there. It is covering up the backside of my main computer desk.

Mom and Dad and husband Randy, you should notice your photos sitting on my beautiful chest of drawers I purchased at a used furniture store for only $69.
Mother-in-law Edna, you will see the pretty pink and blue flowering basket sitting on top of my filing cabinet.

The angel picture hanging on the wall was made by the woman who would have been my sister-in-law, had she lived. She died several years before my husband and I met.

In the den, I have a mini-trampoline and a few other portable “exercise toys” set up to help me stay limber. Eventually, I will get disciplined about going back to the YMCA where I hold a membership.

My big focus has been on nutrition. To make certain that I do not ever get cancer again, I have been focusing a lot of my energy on diet and nutrition and food combining. It is a work-in-progress.

The basic goals that I am working my way toward are the following:

* Eat only raw fruit until noon.

* Working my way toward trying to make certain that at least 50% of what I consume daily is raw: raw fruit, raw vegetables, raw seeds and nuts (non-roasted), homemade juiced drinks of veggies and fruit (non-pasteurized).

* Try to not eat proteins and starches at the same meal.

This is based on Harvey and Marilyn Diamond’s book called “Fit for Life” and Harvey Diamond’s book called “Fit for Life Not Fat for Life.”

Here is a review of the “Fit for Life” book, in case you are curious to hear more.

Ask DJ Lyons Book Review: Fit For Life by Harvey and Marilyn Diamond

I have met with both my oncologist and my radiation oncologist. They are both very pleased with my progress. Since I am cancer-free, I only have to see them once every three months now.

All in all, I am a very blessed woman. I am eternally grateful to God and to all of your prayers and support.

I wish you all every happiness and a wonderful blessed day.

With love,
Healing Seeker aka Debbie

Port

1st of February 2011

I am extremely grateful to be cancer-free. All through this cancer journey I traveled, I was so proud that I only had nine pity parties. I am sorry to say that with today’s verbal bombshell, I briefly succumbed to pity party number ten.

Before I continue – let me reassure you that I still remain cancer-free. So it is not that. Phew!

A brief review:
Jan. 7, 2010 – Stage 3A Breast Cancer diagnosis
Jan. 15, 2010 – Surgery to get Sub Q Port implanted for chemo purposes
Feb. 4 to July 1, 2010 – 8 chemo sessions three weeks apart
Aug. 11, 2010 – Double Mastectomy, removal of 10 lymph nodes underneath left arm, and full Hysterectomy
Sept. 15 to Nov. 5, 2010 – 35 radiation session
Nov. 11, 2010 – CT Scan & Bone Scan reveals that there is no more cancer in my body. Woo-hoo!

I have been thrilled and so very grateful to be cancer-free. There is just some tweaking that needs to be done to get back to “normal.”

Since getting the ten lymph nodes removed on August 11, 2010, my left upper arm has been swollen and rather painful. On a pain scale of 1 to 10, 0 pain until I move my arm in the wrong way to a pain level of 6 or 7 that would last for a minute or two. This would precipitate a brief gasp, a slowing down of action, and then I resume normal activity after a relatively brief span of time. This is to be expected. It’s called Lymphdemia.

Starting a couple of weeks before Christmas 2010, I noticed that my upper right arm and right neck would have frequent spasms of pain throughout the day or night. I finally went to see my surgeon about this on Jan. 18, 2011.

Dr. Patterson indicated that the pain in the pain and swelling in the right upper arm and neck would have nothing to do with the Double Mastectomy. He feared that the port, which was implanted in my right collar bone area, might have caused a blood clot. I have to admit that I did not sleep very well that night.

He scheduled me for a Chest X-Ray and Ultrasound the very next day. As the ultrasound was being conducted, I asked the technician if she would alert me if she saw a blood clot. She indicated that she was not allowed. Only a doctor could give me those results. I half-jokingly said, “Couldn’t you gasp or make some kind of sound?” She said no.

After the ultrasound was over, the technician said, “I can tell you this. If I had seen a blood clot, I would not have been allowed to let you leave. And you may go.” I thanked her profusely. I slept so much better that night.

The next day, Dr. Patterson removed my port. After all, it serves no purpose if I am not going through chemo. He said, “We can always give you a new one if need be.” Naturally, he and I never want there to be a need to do this as it would indicate that the cancer had returned. My affirmation: I am and will remain cancer-free.

FYI – He confirmed that my ultrasound and chest x-rays confirmed that I was still cancer-free and no blood clots. Woo-hoo!

To remove the part, he had to give me ten Novocain shots to numb the area. Then he had to cut me open to remove it. He cut me in the same location of the original scar so as to not create a new scar. Afterward, he gave me one internal stitch and three outer stitches. I still have the surgical tape covering it up. The pain level after the shots wore off was not that bad. I took some Tylenol. He also requested that I sleep on a recliner that first night only as he did not feel it wise that I fully lie down. I was to come back the next day if I noticed any swelling. Thankfully, it was fine.

Since the port being removed, the swelling in the right upper arm is a little less and the pain in upper arm and right neck happen less frequently.

He also sent me to a physical therapist to deal with the Lymphdemia and Scar Tissue from the surgery.

I am going to Benchmark Physical Therapy in Greeneville, TN. Diane, my therapist, is just as nice as she can be. Ideally, she would like to meet with me 12 times; however, typically, insurance only covers six visits. I’ve been three times so far.

Jan. 25, 2011 – Visit #1
She measured the swelling in both arms by using this water displacement system. I can go back in 3 months or 6 months and have them measured again at no cost. If the swelling has increased, then I could go to my surgeon and get him to prescribe another set of physical therapy sessions.

She is putting me through a set of exercises to do with the hope that I will follow through at home. This is a needs-improvement opportunity. I get so busy with my writing that I have not been great in follow-through. I will work on getting better.

Jan. 27, 2011 – Visit #2
She is doing this procedure to re-map the way my lymph nodes circulate. She plans to teach me this system so that I can do this on myself.

She also needs to flatten and smooth out my scar tissue. She rubs this instrument over my chest area that is the size of a razor. It looks like it is made of firm plastic. There are no metal parts to it at all; however, it feels like she is pushing pins into my chest. On a pain scale of 1 to 10, the pain level is a 9. I am working on going to my “happy place” to not focus on how much this hurts. She explained that if my scar tissue does not get loose from my chest wall, reconstruction surgery will be really painful.

She wants me to jerk and manipulate and roughly massage my chest area to try to loosen this area up. I am going to have to turn into a bit of a masochist. I don’t remember anybody forewarning me about any of this.

She also prescribed this day compression sleeve and night compression sleeve through Oxy-Care. I found out that my insurance does NOT cover the sleeves. The night sleeve, which is quite bulky, costs $149. You also have to purchase two sets of bandages to help hold this in place. I believe they said that would be another $32. The day compression sleeve costs $59.

Apparently, no insurance company covers these sleeves even though they are very necessary for someone with Lymphdemia. When I asked Diane why she thought this was, she said it probably was determined by the same people who suggested that women wait until they are at least 40 before they get annual mammograms. This is ridiculous because more and more women in their 20’s and 30’s are getting breast cancer. There was even a little girl who got it at age 2. She is 4 now. Sadly, breast cancer is no respecter of age.

My appointment to get fitted for the sleeves is tomorrow, Feb. 2, 2011.

Feb. 1, 2011 – Visit #3
This was the visit where I received the verbal bomb shell. I reported to Diane about the prices of the sleeves. I had been thinking that I would probably just get the day sleeve that costs $59 as that should probably be sufficient. My speculation was that after all, I would only need the night sleeve for a few weeks until the swelling in my left upper arm returns to normal.

Here’s the bombshell. According to my physical therapist, my left upper arm will NEVER return to normal. She indicated that I will need to use those two sleeves for the rest of my life. I must admit that I tear up at the very thought.

I came home all dejected. I ended up sobbing in Randy’s arms. I told him that the sleeves were a life sentence. He, wise and loving man that he is, said words to the effect that it is better than a death sentence. He is grateful that it is something that we can handle and deal with. He reminded me that there would be a lot of people grateful if they only had to deal with the sleeves. He is right. It is just that I had no clue that this is something that will be with me for years and years. No one in my cancer support group had ever hinted about anything like this. I am anxious to talk to them at the next meeting.

To the best of my understanding, this is Diane’s explanation. The swelling in my upper left arm is stagnant water. The job of the lymph nodes is to circulate that stagnant water so that is free-moving. But since all ten lymph nodes in my left underarm area are gone, they will never be able to do this. The day sleeve is to help manage the swelling during the day. The night sleeve is a form of therapy.

The night sleeve is very big and bulky. Randy and I may need to trade sides of the bed. I hope there is room for the three of us in our queen-size bed: Randy, me, and the night sleeve. I’ll include pictures in my next blog.

Randy took me out to eat to get comfort food. How is this for irony? As I stuffed my face at Golden Corral in Morristown, Tennessee, I read a book that I recently ordered from Amazon.com called “Fit for Life, Not Fat for Life” by Harvey Diamond.

I am mostly feeling calmer now. My writing helps calm me down as well.

I guess I had been resting in the thought that all these treatments I would be going through were a year or two of my life and then I would move on. The sleeves, according to Diane, will be necessary for the rest of my life or I risk getting Cellulites and having to be hospitalized to lower the swelling. The good news is that it has not spread to my lower arms or hands. I pray that it never will. I also pray that in my case, she will be wrong.

In any case, most days, I am doing really well. It was just a shock to my system to hear her words. I am not thrilled with the idea of being held back by physical limitations. I don’t think that is the way that God meant us to be. So I am going to affirm freedom for myself. This will be a work-in-progress as well.

I would appreciate your prayers of support that the swelling in my arms resume to normal and that the pain goes away. I appreciate all you have done for me throughout this journey.

I wish you all the best. May you be happy and healthy now and always!

With so much love,
Healing Seeker aka Debbie

Posted by: healingseeker | December 25, 2010

Merry Christmas and a happy update from Healing Seeker

Christmas Day, 25 December 2010

Merry Christmas to you and yours! I hope it has been a blessed day for you.

I realize I have not written in quite some time. My happy update is that I am completely cancer-free. They ran a CT Scan to support this fact. The skin tag on my lower right breast got biopsied. It also proved to be nothing. My blood levels are finally back to normal as well. So, other than getting my port flushed monthly, I now only have to have an exam with my oncologist every two months instead of every month.

If my reports continue to be good, then I should be due to have reconstruction surgery around November of 2011. At that time, they will remove my port as well.

I do have a couple of minor health issues; however, they are nothing to do with cancer.

Issue number one: the CT Scan revealed that I have mild fat on my liver. A lipid profile was run. My cholesterol is good. The other things they test for were fine. So the only cure is diet and exercise. Since my goal is to safely lose 60 pounds prior to having surgery, this is simply extra motivation. The good news is that I have lost 25 pounds since beginning this entire cancer journey. As of this past Wednesday, I only have 53 more pounds to go.

I am working with a dietician to help make this happen. My strong focus has been on working out a life style change that I can live with. This change includes attempting to eat five to six times a day rather than three, following the food pyramid, and striving to lower my calorie intake over all. It also includes visits to the YMCA or working out at home. This is all a work-in-progress where some days go better than others. Some of it requires re-educating myself about nutrition, etc.

The first 17 of those 25 pounds were largely credited to chemo. Some people gain weight with chemo. I lost since because I could not taste food, I did not feel motivated to eat. Now that I can taste everything, I am having a blast cooking, trying out new recipes, and experimenting with things like using a juicer to up my vegetable intake, etc.

My other health issue is that I have laryngitis. I barely can talk with a whisper. It is not a cold; however, my throat does feel quite raw. I guess it is allergies or some such thing. It started December 23rd. I seem to require a bit more sleep with this situation. I’m glad that I was able to spend quality time with my family prior to Christmas when I was still feeling fine. I’m sure it will blow over fairly quickly. If not, I will make a doctor’s visit once the offices open up once again.

I am so grateful that all in all, I can make such a positive report.

Oh, a little comical relief tale to report. From the Reach to Recovery group, I was issued two cloth breasts to place inside my bra. I finally decided to try them out a few weeks back when they were holding an early Thanksgiving celebration at the nursing home for residents and their families. I put on one of my husband’s favorite outfits that had a somewhat low v-necked fitted top. I had to take out quite a bit of stuffing from each little pillow form so that it would fit nicely inside of each bra cup.

As my husband and I sat with my mother-in-law, waiting for the dinner to begin, he pointed out a rather distressing fact. One of the pillow forms had come out of the bra and was down near my waist. The other pillow form was popping out of the shirt. I excused myself to the bathroom, took out both pillow forms, wrapped them in my sweater, and muddled my way through the rest of dinner. So much for trying to look like a woman with curves! Smile!

Fortunately, I was due to meet with my surgeon that week. I asked if there was some better alternative. He prescribed a visit to Oxy-Care. They were able to issue me bras with inserts. I was given a special bra form silicone insert called Amoena Essential. My insurance covered it completely. It has the look and feel of a breast. It is heavy enough that it won’t pop out.

Watch this video for full details:

http://www.amoena.com/us/AboutAmoena/AmoenaMovie/

My computer had glitches in it when trying to play the video. Here’s their website in case you need more information:

http://www.amoena.com/us/homepage.htm

This is the bra insert that I have:

http://www.amoena.com/us/Products/Breastforms/Essential/

The other somewhat comical note is the following. When I had the double mastectomy, if I had decided never to have reconstruction surgery, the surgeon would have made my chest totally flat. Since I did want to have reconstruction surgery, he left enough folds of skin so that the plastic surgeon, a year from now, has something to work with. I must admit that it is NOT a pretty sight; however, it is for a very good cause and for only one year. I finally realized that it reminds me of a Shar-Pei dog – the one with wrinkles. By the way, it may sound like I am putting myself down. I really am not. It is simply my way of having a sense of humor about it. None of this is coming from my husband. He loves me with or without breasts. This is simply me being somewhat blunt, matter-of-fact, and humorous about my current situation.

All in all, I have a heart full of gratitude to be cancer-free aka in remission. What a wonderful blessing that is!

I wish you and yours a very happy Christmas and a wonderful upcoming New Year. My expectation is that 2011 will be a much happier and healthier year than 2010. I hope that will be the case for you as well.

Much love,
Healing Seeker aka Debbie

Posted by: healingseeker | November 7, 2010

Other than two flies in the ointment, I am fine

7 November 2010

The good news is that I completed my last radiation session on Friday, November 5th for breast cancer. Other than taking the low-dosage chemo tablet for five years, as far as I know, I am done with all treatments. I am grateful to be “in remission” aka cancer-free.

So what is the fly in the ointment? On November 4th, I went in for my monthly check-up to get my port flushed and to have my blood checked. The nurse practitioner noticed that on the bottom part of my right breast, there was a little “skin tag.” It looks like a small mole. If that has been there for a long time, then it is nothing to be concerned about. If it is new, then it MIGHT be something to be concerned about. My husband doesn’t recall it being there before. I can’t recall whether or not it has been there before. She and the oncologist did not recall it either. So in the interest of not taking any chances, I go to see my surgeon on November 30th to get it scraped off and biopsied. The only way to know whether or not it is cancer is to stick it under a microscope.

It unsettled me in the first few hours of hearing about this as I wanted to be truly done with all treatments. Little by little, I have been making my peace about it. If it is something, I might need a few more radiation treatments. If it is nothing, as I pray and hope will be the case, we will have the peace of mind of knowing that we have investigated anything suspicious to make certain I stay in the “healthy and whole” route all the way.

Also, they will send me to have a CT Scan and Bone Scan once the insurance company clears it to make certain that my body is now truly clear of all cancer cells.

I certainly hope this is the case as I have turned in my wig and packed away all scarves. I certainly do not want to have to dig any of those out again. I would appreciate all prayers that my body is truly clear.

The other fly in the ointment is that one of the women in my cancer support group is in the hospital right now. The type of cancer she had has now spread to her liver. Tragically, the only thing that they can do for her is to strive to manage the pain. Please say a prayer for her that she remains pain-free until God takes her home and that her husband will be okay. I have visited several times hoping and praying that she will rally and be healed. Sadly, the hospital apparently has no other treatment options they can provide other than pain management. It makes me feel so sad and helpless.

I am so grateful for all your love, prayers, and support. I feel fairly confident that the November 30th procedure will not turn up anything. I just wish that this woman in my group would be healed. If I feel this sad and I have only known her since February, I cannot even begin to imagine how her husband of 39 ½ years must be feeling. He told me the other day that she is his whole life. He tries really hard to be strong while sitting with her in the hospital and saving his tears for when he gets home. It is really sad. A few of us from the cancer support group have been visiting her and sharing updates. I just wish there was happier news to report.

Thank you again for being there for me. I hope you have a very happy week. I am looking forward to visiting my younger brother and his family this coming weekend while my second to the youngest niece celebrates her sixth birthday party. That will be lots of fun!

Much love and blessings to you all,

Healing Seeker aka Debbie

7 November 2010
The good news is that I completed my last radiation session on Friday, November 5th for breast cancer. Other than taking the low-dosage chemo tablet for five years, as far as I know, I am done with all treatments. I am grateful to be “in remission” aka cancer-free.
So what is the fly in the ointment? On November 4th, I went in for my monthly check-up to get my port flushed and to have my blood checked. The nurse practitioner noticed that on the bottom part of my right breast, there was a little “skin tag.” It looks like a small mole. If that has been there for a long time, then it is nothing to be concerned about. If it is new, then it MIGHT be something to be concerned about. My husband doesn’t recall it being there before. I can’t recall whether or not it has been there before. She and the oncologist did not recall it either. So in the interest of not taking any chances, I go to see my surgeon on November 30th to get it scraped off and biopsied. The only way to know whether or not it is cancer is to stick it under a microscope.
It unsettled me in the first few hours of hearing about this as I wanted to be truly done with all treatments. Little by little, I have been making my peace about it. If it is something, I might need a few more radiation treatments. If it is nothing, as I pray and hope will be the case, we will have the peace of mind of knowing that we have investigated anything suspicious to make certain I stay in the “healthy and whole” route all the way.
Also, they will send me to have a CT Scan and Bone Scan once the insurance company clears it to make certain that my body is now truly clear of all cancer cells.
I certainly hope this is the case as I have turned in my wig and packed away all scarves. I certainly do not want to have to dig any of those out again. I would appreciate all prayers that my body is truly clear.
The other fly in the ointment is that one of the women in my cancer support group is in the hospital right now. The type of cancer she had has now spread to her liver. Tragically, the only thing that they can do for her is to strive to manage the pain. Please say a prayer for her that she remains pain-free until God takes her home and that her husband will be okay. I have visited several times hoping and praying that she will rally and be healed. Sadly, the hospital apparently has no other treatment options they can provide other than pain management. It makes me feel so sad and helpless.
I am so grateful for all your love, prayers, and support. I feel fairly confident that the November 30th procedure will not turn up anything. I just wish that this woman in my group would be healed. If I feel this sad and I have only known her since February, I cannot even begin to imagine how her husband of 39 ½ years must be feeling. He told me the other day that she is his whole life. He tries really hard to be strong while sitting with her in the hospital and saving his tears for when he gets home. It is really sad. A few of us from the cancer support group have been visiting her and sharing updates. I just wish there was happier news to report.
Thank you again for being there for me. I hope you have a very happy week. I am looking forward to visiting my younger brother and his family this coming weekend while my second to the youngest niece celebrates her sixth birthday party. That will be lots of fun!
Much love and blessings to you all,
Healing Seeker aka Debbie

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